How to Counter 4 Myths About Flatbed Truck Driving

A huge factor in the success of recruiting truck drivers comes down to knowing your audience and knowing how to talk to them. Recruiting qualified drivers for flatbed trucks can be fairly difficult. In addition to battling other fleets for the best possible drivers, when recruiting flatbed drivers it’s important to address the reputation of the position itself . . . which can be viewed negatively by prospects.

Knowing what the current perception is among drivers and prospects, and being able to counter those opinions are a direct factor in how successful you will be filling open flatbed driver positions. Here are a few of the more common misconceptions about driving a flatbed truck and ways to not only counter the argument, but frame the so-called “downside” in a positive light.

  1. The Physical Labor Associated with Flatbed Trucks is a Negative

 
Some prospective drivers avoid getting behind the wheel of a flatbed because they don’t want to deal with the associated physical labor on top of the normal every day grind of trucking. Some fleets do require drivers to assist in the loading and unloading of freight. However, just as with any other occupation, the requirements and responsibilities vary from fleet to fleet. If your fleet has a system in place for loading and unloading that takes the entire responsibility off the shoulders of the driver, that is something that needs to be brought to the prospect’s attention.

How to Counter the Myth:

The labor itself could actually be used as a selling point to make the job more attractive to some drivers. Truck driving is inherently a sedentary lifestyle. It requires long hours of sitting in one place and being relatively inactive. Constantly being on the road behind the wheel of a big rig doesn’t exactly make it easy for drivers to stay in shape. By positively framing the associated activity of flatbed driving as a benefit for driver health as opposed to a detriment could help prospects to see the appeal of the job.

  1. Flatbed Drivers are Underpaid

 
Perhaps the most common objection drivers have is the pay rate. All truckers want to be well paid for their work. They spend long stretches of time on the road away from family and friends, and want to be well compensated for that sacrifice.

Flatbed trucking in particular has been saddled with a reputation by drivers as being a low paying job. More specifically, drivers consider it an underpaying job, because of the “extra” work involved such as possibly loading, unloading, and securing loads as previously discussed.

How to Counter the Myth:

When one takes a look at the actual hard numbers though, that is simply just not the case. Drivers who operate flatbed trucks can actually earn $10,000 or more a year than a typical truck driver, while driving the same distance. This clearly shows just how profitable the job can really be. Educating drivers on the different pay scale and showing them how well flatbed drivers are paid in reality could begin to finally destroy this long-held myth.

  1. Operating a Flatbed Truck is Inherently Dangerous

 
Another common sticking point among prospects is their view of the perceived dangers to driving a flatbed. After all, no one wants to risk their health and safety. The added steps of securing loads and the tarping process is an added aspect of the job that can be legitimately dangerous for drivers. But . . . when drivers adhere to proper loading and securing standards the risk drops dramatically.

In addition, truck drivers are known for pushing themselves to the limit and staying on the road long after they are tired and fatigued. Working under these conditions would add danger and uncertainty to any job not just truck driving.

How to Counter the Myth:

Although it is impossible to eliminate all of the risk involved, making sure drivers are well-trained on how to properly secure and tarp loads, and having well-rested drivers minimizes most of the dangers associated with flatbed driving.

  1. Women Drivers Need Not Apply

 
Fleets would benefit from actively seeking out women for flatbed positions as well. Because of the labor and danger involved with the job, many fleets don’t even consider women or pursue them for open flatbed positions. As we’ve covered before, women truckers are becoming a bigger part of the industry.

How to Counter the Myth:

There are women flatbed drivers currently on the road today, and there is no reason that, when properly trained, more women couldn’t help to fill the void and help companies land the drivers they need. Highlight the women flatbed drivers in your fleet to show the possibilities to other potential women drivers. Actively targeting women and broadening the spectrum of prospects that fleets are searching for could ultimately lead to a successful recruiting push.

Flatbed Trucking is Different and Requires a Different Kind of Driver

 
It’s important to know and acknowledge that flatbed trucking is different from driving an ordinary truck. The four areas we have covered are common sticking points among drivers in regards to taking a flatbed truck job.

Having a Valid Counterpoint is Crucial

Muscular Arm Black and White Pic

  1. Physical labor or activity is a benefit.


Money Black and White Pic

  1. Drivers are compensated well and could earn 10k more than their counterparts per year.


Hazard_Danger Black and White Sign

  1. Adhering to recommended safety guidelines and staying well rested minimizes much of the job’s risk factors.


Woman Black and White Pic

  1. Broadening the recruiting pool to include women can only improve the chances of filling open positions.

Having a Valid Counterpoint is Crucial


Muscular Arm Black and White Pic

  1. Physical labor or activity is a benefit.


Money Black and White Pic

  1. Drivers are compensated well and could earn 10k more than their counterparts per year.


Hazard_Danger Black and White Sign

  1. Adhering to recommended safety guidelines and staying well rested minimizes much of the job’s risk factors.


Woman Black and White Pic

  1. Broadening the recruiting pool to include women can only improve the chances of filling open positions.

Having a Valid Counterpoint is Crucial


Muscular Arm Black and White Pic

  1. Physical labor or activity is a benefit.

Money Black and White Pic

  1. Drivers are compensated well and could earn 10k more than their counterparts per year.

Hazard_Danger Black and White Sign

  1. Adhering to recommended safety guidelines and staying well rested minimizes much of the job’s risk factors.

Woman Black and White Pic

  1. Broadening the recruiting pool to include women can only improve the chances of filling open positions.

Having a Valid Counterpoint is Crucial


Muscular Arm Black and White Pic

  1. Physical labor or activity is a benefit.

Money Black and White Pic

  1. Drivers are compensated well and could earn 10k more than their counterparts per year.

Hazard_Danger Black and White Sign

  1. Adhering to recommended safety guidelines and staying well rested minimizes much of the job’s risk factors.

Woman Black and White Pic

  1. Broadening the recruiting pool to include women can only improve the chances of filling open positions.

By being able to offer a different viewpoint and framing issues in a more positive light, you can begin to erode the negative reputation flatbed trucking has garnered and gain the quality recruits that fleets need.

Recruiting Consultation CTA